Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, looks out the window at her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Rosales recieved asylum in 2017 after experiencing domestic violence from her son's father. “I get another chance at life here,” Rosales said.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, looks out the window at her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Rosales recieved asylum in 2017 after experiencing domestic violence from her son's father. “I get another chance at life here,” Rosales said.

 Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, sits with her mother, Rosa, and her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in the living room of their mother mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018.

Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, sits with her mother, Rosa, and her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in the living room of their mother mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018.

 Rosales prepares an  antojito,  a type of snack she said is popular in Honduras. Rosales and her family enjoy going to Sewell Park and bring along a day’s worth of food to eat while they enjoy the river.

Rosales prepares an antojito, a type of snack she said is popular in Honduras. Rosales and her family enjoy going to Sewell Park and bring along a day’s worth of food to eat while they enjoy the river.

 Lizeth Rosales, center, goes to the San Marcos river with her brother, left, and her 2-year-old daughter.

Lizeth Rosales, center, goes to the San Marcos river with her brother, left, and her 2-year-old daughter.

 David Rosales, 11, watches his 2-year-old sister, Kelly, play with his mother's phone as they drive to a doctor's appointment on Friday, June 22, 2018.

David Rosales, 11, watches his 2-year-old sister, Kelly, play with his mother's phone as they drive to a doctor's appointment on Friday, June 22, 2018.

 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, stands in a health facility with her two children, David, 11, and Kelly, 2, in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, stands in a health facility with her two children, David, 11, and Kelly, 2, in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

 Rosales holds her 2-year-old daughter Kelly during a doctor's appointment in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

Rosales holds her 2-year-old daughter Kelly during a doctor's appointment in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

 Rosales shops at an H-E-B grocery store with family members in Kyle, Texas. “It’s the only store I’ve been able to find that reminds me of home,” she said. “The produce is as rich and as fresh as the kinds we have in Honduras.”

Rosales shops at an H-E-B grocery store with family members in Kyle, Texas. “It’s the only store I’ve been able to find that reminds me of home,” she said. “The produce is as rich and as fresh as the kinds we have in Honduras.”

 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, grills meat at Texas State University’s Sewell Park in San Marcos on June 28, 2018. Rosales received asylum in May 2017 as a victim of domestic violence, a circumstance that Attorney General Jeff Sessions said will no longer qualify victims for asylum in the United States. Photographed for the Austin American-Statesman

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, grills meat at Texas State University’s Sewell Park in San Marcos on June 28, 2018. Rosales received asylum in May 2017 as a victim of domestic violence, a circumstance that Attorney General Jeff Sessions said will no longer qualify victims for asylum in the United States. Photographed for the Austin American-Statesman

 Rosa Serrato, from Honduras, watches her 2-year-old granddaughter play outside their home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Serrato's daughter and grandson live with her after receiving asylum in May 2017 as the victims of domestic violence.

Rosa Serrato, from Honduras, watches her 2-year-old granddaughter play outside their home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Serrato's daughter and grandson live with her after receiving asylum in May 2017 as the victims of domestic violence.

 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in their mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Kelly was born in the United States after Rosales reconnected with a childhood friend that fled Honduras from gang violence.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in their mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Kelly was born in the United States after Rosales reconnected with a childhood friend that fled Honduras from gang violence.

 Rosales walks into the living room of her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Her mother fled to the United States when Rosales was 13, and reconnected with her when she arrived nearly 15 years later in 2014.

Rosales walks into the living room of her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Her mother fled to the United States when Rosales was 13, and reconnected with her when she arrived nearly 15 years later in 2014.

 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, looks out the window at her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Rosales recieved asylum in 2017 after experiencing domestic violence from her son's father. “I get another chance at life here,” Rosales said.
 Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, sits with her mother, Rosa, and her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in the living room of their mother mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018.
 Rosales prepares an  antojito,  a type of snack she said is popular in Honduras. Rosales and her family enjoy going to Sewell Park and bring along a day’s worth of food to eat while they enjoy the river.
 Lizeth Rosales, center, goes to the San Marcos river with her brother, left, and her 2-year-old daughter.
 David Rosales, 11, watches his 2-year-old sister, Kelly, play with his mother's phone as they drive to a doctor's appointment on Friday, June 22, 2018.
 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, stands in a health facility with her two children, David, 11, and Kelly, 2, in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.
 Rosales holds her 2-year-old daughter Kelly during a doctor's appointment in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.
 Rosales shops at an H-E-B grocery store with family members in Kyle, Texas. “It’s the only store I’ve been able to find that reminds me of home,” she said. “The produce is as rich and as fresh as the kinds we have in Honduras.”
 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, grills meat at Texas State University’s Sewell Park in San Marcos on June 28, 2018. Rosales received asylum in May 2017 as a victim of domestic violence, a circumstance that Attorney General Jeff Sessions said will no longer qualify victims for asylum in the United States. Photographed for the Austin American-Statesman
 Rosa Serrato, from Honduras, watches her 2-year-old granddaughter play outside their home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Serrato's daughter and grandson live with her after receiving asylum in May 2017 as the victims of domestic violence.
 Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in their mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Kelly was born in the United States after Rosales reconnected with a childhood friend that fled Honduras from gang violence.
 Rosales walks into the living room of her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Her mother fled to the United States when Rosales was 13, and reconnected with her when she arrived nearly 15 years later in 2014.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, looks out the window at her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Rosales recieved asylum in 2017 after experiencing domestic violence from her son's father. “I get another chance at life here,” Rosales said.

Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, sits with her mother, Rosa, and her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in the living room of their mother mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018.

Rosales prepares an antojito, a type of snack she said is popular in Honduras. Rosales and her family enjoy going to Sewell Park and bring along a day’s worth of food to eat while they enjoy the river.

Lizeth Rosales, center, goes to the San Marcos river with her brother, left, and her 2-year-old daughter.

David Rosales, 11, watches his 2-year-old sister, Kelly, play with his mother's phone as they drive to a doctor's appointment on Friday, June 22, 2018.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, stands in a health facility with her two children, David, 11, and Kelly, 2, in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

Rosales holds her 2-year-old daughter Kelly during a doctor's appointment in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018.

Rosales shops at an H-E-B grocery store with family members in Kyle, Texas. “It’s the only store I’ve been able to find that reminds me of home,” she said. “The produce is as rich and as fresh as the kinds we have in Honduras.”

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, grills meat at Texas State University’s Sewell Park in San Marcos on June 28, 2018. Rosales received asylum in May 2017 as a victim of domestic violence, a circumstance that Attorney General Jeff Sessions said will no longer qualify victims for asylum in the United States. Photographed for the Austin American-Statesman

Rosa Serrato, from Honduras, watches her 2-year-old granddaughter play outside their home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Serrato's daughter and grandson live with her after receiving asylum in May 2017 as the victims of domestic violence.

Lizeth Rosales, an asylum recipient from Honduras, plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Kelly, in their mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on June 22, 2018. Kelly was born in the United States after Rosales reconnected with a childhood friend that fled Honduras from gang violence.

Rosales walks into the living room of her mother's mobile home in Kyle, Texas, on Friday, June 22, 2018. Her mother fled to the United States when Rosales was 13, and reconnected with her when she arrived nearly 15 years later in 2014.

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